The Complete Godzilla Bandai vinyl list
(Large Scale)




For the Toho film “Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah” Bandai released its first Large Scale figure during the same year the film was released.

Large Scale Godzilla 91


Bandai’s Large Scale Godzilla 91 stands at over 14 inches and is around 22 inches long. The figure comes in a cardboard box that pictures artwork of Godzilla 91 on the front and sides and Godzilla 84 on the back. Godzilla with King Ghidorah wrapped behind him is also pictured on the box. The box has a plastic handle on top. A gold Toho license sticker is found on the box and pictures a silhouette of Godzilla .

Bandai reissued the Large Scale Godzilla 91 sometime in the late 90’s. There are noticeable differences on the toy and the box when compared to the first issue.

Comparisions of the Original and Reissue Large Scale Godzilla 91


It is difficult to identify which Large Scale version of Godzilla 91 is the orignal and the reissue without comparing, especially when looking online. There is a slight size difference, with the Original being a bit taller and the only paint difference is the silver used on the spines and the claws, but very minimal. There are some hints that can help. The most notable is the hard vinyl on the original. While some areas on the reissue has softer vinyl, like the arms and tail, the head is the easiest to squeeze, sporting the softest vinyl piece on the figure. All body parts, including the head, on the Original has harder vinyl that cannot be squeezed. Unfortunately this information don't help when looking at the figure online.

Tail comparisions of the Original and Reissue Large Scale Godzilla 91


When comparing the tails of the Original and the reissue, The Original has more of a lift than the reissue. The overall size and thickness of the tail on the Original is more obvious when compared to the thinner and smaller size of the tail on the reissue. The paint highlights run farther up the tail of the reissue than on the Original. But again, this information doesn't help when looking at the figure online.

Neck comparisions of the Original and Reissue Large Scale Godzilla 91


When looking at the back of the necks of both figures, where the head connects to the body, there is a notciable gap on the Original when compared to the reissiue which has the back of the neck and the back of the spines line up evenly. This may result in the "thickness" of the vinyl on the Original. After checking some auctions of the Large Scale Godzilla 91 online, I found this gap noticable when there is a side view picture of the Original. When searching this figure online, if this picture is not present, ask for a side view picture of the figure and look to see if you find a gap in the back of the neck where the head connects to the body. This will indicate if it's an Original or a reissue.

Box comparisions of the Original and Reissue Large Scale Godzilla 91 (front)


There are only two major differences when comparing the Box of the Original figure and the reissue. The Original Box has more of a lighter color to the cardboard while the reissue has more of a darker color cardboard. I first suspected age had something to do with the darker color of the reissued box, but since the Original is believed to be five years older than the reissue, I would think the Original box would suffer the same circumstance, unless the example of the Original I have was well preserved.

Box comparisions of the Original and Reissue Large Scale Godzilla 91 (side)


The second difference would be the "Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah" logo found on the Original box. This logo can be found on both sides of the box, the bottom of the back of the box and the top of the box.

Box of the Original Large Scale Godzilla 91 (top)


The Logo found on the top of the box is the largest when compared to the other three logos and the Gold Toho license sticker can be found there, at least on my example. The reissue box sports no "Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah" logos and sports the Gold Toho license sticker picturing the Marvel Comics Godzilla. It is suspected that the Toho License Sticker with the Marvel Comics Godzilla made it's first appearence in late 1994 for the film "Godzilla vs. Space Godzilla". It is believed any standard Godzilla figure produced before 1994 and sports a Toho license sticker of the Marvel Comics Godzilla is a reissue. The reissue of the Large Scale Godzilla 91 is believed to be released in 1996.

It is believe that a “Gold Version” of the Large Scale Godzilla 91 that was available to only Toho employees exists. It’s unknown how many were made and I have yet to see proof if this is a legitimate release.

*UPDATE* After veiwing the extra features from the Toho DVD "Godzilla vs. Biollante" during an interview with someone from the Toho staff, a closeup can be seen of a Large Scale Godzilla 91 painted Bronze. It appears the vinyl is black with bronze pained or brushed over it. I speculate this interview was filmed around or after 1991 since that was when the toy was first released. This "Bronze Version" conflicts with the "Gold Version" that was mentioned above, but to my knowledge, there has never been a Large Scale Bronze Godzilla 91 offered to the public.

For the Toho film “Godzilla vs. Space Godzilla” Bandai released its largest Godzilla figure.

Big Scale/Super Premium Godzilla 94


One of the most desirable Godzilla figures was released in 1994. Bandai’s Big Scale Godzilla stands at almost 25 inches tall and is around 40 inches long and sold in a very large size box that pictures the toy on both sides. The tail and some of the back spines needed to be assembled. A tail support is included and is made out of cardboard which needed to be folded together. Plastic eyes were also needed to be attached to the figure. The figure came with a large size tag, but was not attached to the figure despite the tag having a punch hole. It is believed that Dealers could attach the tags themselves if they didn’t want to sell the toy in the box, but I have never seen this toy sold with the tag attached. The front of the tag pictures Godzilla 94 and the back of the tag has assembly instruction and the usual information. This figure has been known as "Big Scale" and "Super Premium" Godzilla 94. Most collectors prefer one or the other, so this article will refer to this figure as the Big Scale Godzilla 94. At the time of release, this toy was sold in Japan for 19,800 yen, which is roughly under $200 stateside.

Bandai reissued the Big Scale Godzilla 94 sometime in the late 90’s. I have not been able to verify if there are any differences between the first issue and the reissue.

It is believe that a “Bronze version” of the Big Scale Godzilla 94 that was available to only Toho employees exists. It’s unknown how many were made and I have yet to see proof if this is a legitimate release.

For the Toho film “Godzilla vs. Destroyah” Bandai reissued the Big Scale Godzilla as a limited paint variant.

Final Premium Melting Godzilla


Released in 1995, The Final Premium Melting Godzilla is the exact mold used from the Big Scale Godzilla 94 but done in orange vinyl with red highlights. Gold was used for the claws. The box is the same size, but with updated information and pictures and also comes with the tail support. No tag comes with the figure, but a folded paper with assembly instruction is included along with a plastic card that pictures Godzilla and is numbered out of 4,000 pieces. This number matches a gold plate that is found on the bottom of the toys foot. The gold plate is taped on the foot and says “Godzilla Memorial” with the number it was issued as. It has been mentioned that many of these figures were sold with the number of the card and the gold plate not matching. The Final Premium Melting Godzilla was originally sold in Japan for 25,000 yen, which is roughly about $250, making this Bandai’s most expensive Godzilla figure ever released to the public.

For the film “Godzilla 2000” it was believe that Bandai was going to produce a Large Scale Godzilla 2000 vinyl figure, but was never released. Bandai Rep. Yasumasa Kawauchi mentioned at Asian Fantasy Film Expo 2002 that most Japanese live in small homes and don’t have much room for such large toys. It is possible that Bandai may never produce a Large Scale figure again.

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